Tim Lamorte

Nuclear options

Tim Lamorte
Nuclear options
Ray St. Clair of Michigan, a friend of Jun Yasuda, hugs a tree outside Indian Point. St. Clair belongs to the Ojibwe tribe, which has a reservation in Minnesota.

Ray St. Clair of Michigan, a friend of Jun Yasuda, hugs a tree outside Indian Point. St. Clair belongs to the Ojibwe tribe, which has a reservation in Minnesota.

BUCHANAN, NY — Every March, a series of events unfolds around the Indian Point Energy Center. That tradition continued on Sunday, March 10.

Jun Yasuda, the Japanese Buddhist nun who founded the Grafton Peace Pagoda, led a walk from the Cortlandt Metro-North Station to the nuclear power plant’s former entrance at the intersection of Broadway and Bleakley Avenue in Buchanan. Outside the gate, participants placed origami cranes on the ground in remembrance of the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011.

The walkers then proceeded to Peekskill Landing Park for a Native American water ceremony led by Maria Maybee of the Seneca Nation. Following the ceremony, the Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition (IPSEC) hosted a potluck lunch at American Legion Post 274 in Peekskill, including presentations about Indian Point and music by Fred Gillen Jr.

In January 2017, the plant’s owner, Entergy, announced that its two functioning reactors, Indian Point 2 and Indian Point 3, will shut down in 2020 and 2021, respectively. Indian Point 2 began operation in 1974 and Indian Point 3 in 1976.

Nevertheless, IPSEC remains concerned about the future of the property, specifically about the storage of spent fuel, about a natural gas pipeline 105 feet to the south, and about whether Entergy will sell the site to a new owner. IPSEC wants a 15-member citizens oversight board to monitor the decommissioning.

Maria Maybee leads a water ceremony at Peekskill Landing Park, north of Indian Point’s two domed reactors to the left.

Maria Maybee leads a water ceremony at Peekskill Landing Park, north of Indian Point’s two domed reactors to the left.

Tim Lamorte is an award-winning journalist who has spent more than two decades documenting life along the Hudson River.